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AZ Tech Beat | July 27, 2017

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EyeTech DS releases multi-user eye tracking system for gaming – video

EyeTech DS releases multi-user eye tracking system for gaming – video
Jesse A. Millard

Video contribution from Thomas Hawthorne

As technology progresses further and further, those with life-changing medical conditions are increasingly impacted in a meaningful and helpful way.

Mesa-based Eyetech Digital Systems has been creating eye tracking technology since 1996, and their eye tracking digital systems have primarily helped the lives of ALS patients, Keith Jackson, director of sales and marketing, said.

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With their technology, ALS patients can control the television, the lights within their home and even surf the web without any assistance, and soon will be able to play video games on TVs with friends.

Read: Eyetracking device to diagnose concussions on the sideline

At CES 2015, Eyetech unveiled their new AI Technology which lets developers add eye control to any type of device such as a tablet or computer allowing for easy integration, Jackson said. The new technology is apart of the ongoing movement of having gesture based control of your technology devices in favor of touch based control, Jackson said. In addition, they also released the world’s first multi-user eye tracking system to be used for the gaming industry. Take a look a the video for a demo of the system.

Helping ALS patients gain their independence isn’t Eyetech’s only venture into the medical field. Eyetech announced their partnership at CES with Scottsdale-based startup Saccadous to create a 200 hrtz eye tracker to analyze if an athlete has suffered a concussion, among other medical applications.

Jackson said not only are the two companies hoping to assist with the treatment and diagnoses of neurological disorders like Parkinsons, but they see a large market in football, since the recent movement towards making the game safer for players.

“There’s actually a lot of movement to get mobile solutions on the field…to see if there was a concussion to keep them off the field,” Jackson said.

Read more coverage about eye tracking technology coming out of AZ and from CES at AZTB